Democratic Party Lawfare

The Missouri state legislature has a supermajority of Republicans in the House.  And legislator, of any party, can require a bill to be read aloud on the House floor prior to the House’s final vote on it.  Last spring, Democratic Party legislators initiated a filibuster by requiring each bill being brought up for its final vote to be read aloud.  So far, so good.  The Republican Speaker one-upped the Democrats by having the bills read by computer with the speed control dialed up.  Again, so far, so good.

Iran Nuclear Weapons Deal

In a document Iran submitted to the International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran noted its ability to expand its nuclear enrichment program in just ten years—now nine, since the weapons deal is a year old—and get its nuclear weapons program back on schedule.

What’s interesting here is not the existence of that capability, everyone but President Barack Obama (D) and his Secretary of State John Kerry knew the agreement allowed it.  What’s interesting is that Iran is so open about their intent to do exactly that, and that Iran is so open with their contempt for the Obama administration.

The Iran Nuclear Weapons Agreement

…after a year.

Two days before the anniversary of the nuclear agreement between Iran and world powers, the Islamic Republic attempted to launch a new type of ballistic missile using North Korean technology, multiple intelligence officials tell Fox News.

That the launch failed is neither here nor there.  There are two far more important factors in play here, beyond the mish-mash of items in the Fox News piece.  One is the Iranian contempt for the agreement; for the Obama administration; and for Secretary of State John Kerry, who “negotiated” this agreement to allow Iran delayed access to nuclear weapons—a delay that Iran is studiously ignoring.

Leave it to Obama

…and his fellow Progressives, including his proud acolyte, Democratic Party Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

The Obama administration is working on a series of agreements with foreign governments that would allow them for the first time to serve US technology companies with warrants for email searches and wiretaps—a move that is already stirring debates over privacy, security, crime and terrorism.

And

Under the proposed agreements described by Mr [Brad, Deputy Assistant Attorney General] Wiegmann, foreign investigators would be able to serve a warrant directly on a U.S. firm to see a suspect’s stored emails or intercept their messages in real time….

Democrats’ War on Women Continues

And now these wonderful people are actively going after babies, too.

After demanding immediate emergency funding [for developing a vaccine with which to combat the zika virus, which causes babies in infected pregnant women to be born badly disabled with malformed brains] for months, they walked out on their own bill on Thursday to use the issue as a campaign bludgeon against Republicans.

All for their personal political gain.

As of 7 July, 649 women in the US and territories have evidence of a Zika infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Those numbers are certain to rise in the summer months….

Why is this even a Question?

Republicans officially petitioned the administration Thursday to deny Hillary Clinton access to secret information as Democrats’ presidential nominee, and some GOP lawmakers said if the intelligence community won’t do it, they’ll pass a bill to do it themselves.

Oh, wait—it’s a question because

The White House has said it won’t deny Mrs Clinton access….

On the excuse of tradition, don’t you know.

Never mind the tradition, and the requirement in most serious security régimes—like in a government—of revoking existing security clearances and denying further access to those who’ve committed security violations as egregious as even FBI Director James Comey has documented Clinton having done.

EU, Great Britain, and Taxes

Some…suggestions…from continental leaders regarding Great Britain’s departure from the EU and the Exchequer’s suggestions of British corporate tax rate reductions, via The Wall Street Journal:

  • German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble: we can’t have a “race to the bottom, now can we?”

Why not, I ask—what are you so terrified might result from letting those who earned the money keep more of it?

  • Pierre Moscovici, European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs, Taxation and Customs: let’s not have any of this “exacerbated(?) fiscal competition between ourselves” nonsense.

The Other Supreme Court That’s in the Election Balance

This one is the National Labor Relations Board, a Democrat/union-dominated entity that is nearly the last word on what employers are allowed and required to do.

It’s the NLRB that threatened Boeing with labor unrest expensive lawsuits for its effrontery in wanting to build an aircraft manufacturing plant in the right-to-work state of South Carolina and forced Boeing to keep primary manufacturing in the union state of Washington.

It’s the NLRB that decided that franchise employees actually are jointly employed by the franchise—a McDonald’s burger joint, for instance—and the franchisor—McDonald’s corporate headquarters, for instance—a complete rewrite of the prior NLRB view of franchise employment.

Labor Costs Up, Prices Up

Starbucks is sharply raising its total compensation for its employees in the Seattle area.  Total compensation from wages and stock options is going up some 5% to 15%.  Carefully buried in the very last paragraph of The Seattle Times piece is this little nugget:

Last July, Starbucks raised its prices 3.5 times as much in Seattle as in the rest of the country.  It raised the price of its typical coffeeshop purchase across the U.S. by 1%, but in Seattle by 3.5%.

Hmm….

Economy and Integrity

The PRC is demonstrating the relationship between integrity and a centrally managed economy.

When China let Dongbei Special Steel Group default on a bond payment this spring, it was supposed to mark a new determination to allow long-coddled state industries to suffer the consequences of their bad decisions.

Three months later, the result has been…nothing. The ailing steel mill has missed five more payments on its $6 billion in debt, but has yet to formally file for the equivalent of bankruptcy protection, close unproductive units, or start a restructuring of its operations.